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Random Cluster of Insects
updated: Nov 01, 2012, 10:44 AM

By Edhat Subscriber

I found this cluster of insects (?) In this formation behind a door in my living room. Any idea what they are? They are no longer here...soapy water and paper towels have taken them away but still wonder what they are.

Send this picture as a postcard

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Comments in order of when they were received | (reverse order)

 COMMENT 337886 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 10:56 AM

What I can see is a penny and a large clump of tiny dots. A larger pic might make it clearer what the tiny dots look like close up.

 

 COMMENT 337891 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:02 AM

Probably some form of barklice.

 

 COMMENT 337893 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:03 AM

I have the same thing, and am thinking they might be walking sticks. I am trying to figure out how best to scrape them off safely to relocate outdoors.

 

 COMMENT 337894 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:04 AM

pennyflies?

 

 COMMENT 337895 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:07 AM

Looks like millions of tiny baby spiders to me.... booooo

 

 COMMENT 337904 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:25 AM

I guess moth eggs.

 

 COMMENT 337906 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:28 AM

baby spiders.

 

 COMMENT 337912P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:38 AM

Had something similar on a large window. They were clearly eggs. We left them and after about 10 days, they hatched into little, many-legged creatures... larvae? caterpillars? I was hoping to see them develop, but after a couple of days of hovering in a mass, they just disappeared. Not sure if they got picked off or somehow achieved warp speed to make it to the edge of a huge picture window.

 

 AQUAHOLIC agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 11:58 AM

I usually find these out doors on the stucco walls of our house...I just assumed they were moth eggs or some type of bug eggs.

 

 COMMENT 337937 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 12:35 PM

We've got some of these stuck to our ceiling in places. They've been there for years, and we never bothered to scrape them off. I think they are moth eggs, except ours never hatched... hence stuck, been there for years, etc.

 

 COMMENT 337942 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 12:45 PM

Maybe springtails (Collembola).

 

 COMMENT 337946 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 12:51 PM

Ditto what Aqua said. I find them outside on stucco walls. I leave them alone and sooner or later the majority hatch and move along, but there are always some left behind, which I assume have not evolved correctly and I sweep them away.

 

 COMMENT 337965 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 01:18 PM

Maybe jinkbugs (jindadablabla)

 

 COMMENT 338018 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 02:49 PM

Fungus gnats?

 

 COMMENT 338098P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 04:47 PM

Please do not make any effort to relocate walking sticks outdoors. Kill them. They are not native to our area, and are voracious plant eaters and rapid reproducers.

 

 COMMENT 338104 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 04:50 PM

Wow, 098p. Horrible advice. Lots of plants and insects aren't native to the area and do fine in our ecosystem. Endorsing killing so-called non-native bugs is really short-sighted and wrong. First of all, the eco-system (unlike some people!) adapt and flourish with no detriment to the native or non-native plants. This is a perfect example of lack of knowledge contributing to the encouraging of killing harmless insects because they don't know any better. Not cool!

 

 COMMENT 338146 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-01 06:02 PM

The picture is really not good enough to tell for sure. But like some have suggested, tiger moths often lay eggs in a tight cluster, and when the caterpillars first hatch out they'll hang around together for a while before dispersing. That's an entomologist's best guess. MC

 

 COMMENT 338250P agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 01:40 AM

104---I like you A LOT. So sad that many humans' first thought is "Must Kill It," without even bothering to find out what "It" is.

Why not just slip a bit of paper underneath such clusters, put a glass over the top and help these critters out into the world?

Please, people, stop killing things just because you're bigger and you can lord it over the smaller creatures. It's amazing how little effort it takes to be kind.

 

 COMMENT 338279 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 07:37 AM

338250P - Sorry. Takes more effort to transport hundreds of larvae (which by the way would die outside) than it does to scoop them up with some tissue and flush them.

Let me ask you this...if you had a hundred cockroaches scurrying around your kitchen floor, would you tenderly scoop them up and take them outside? I thought not.

 

 COMMENT 338287 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 07:54 AM

OP here, thanks for the feedback. I'm guessing that they are eggs/larvae of some sort, but they appeared in that circle cluster literally overnight. Unless maybe they were there as barely visible eggs, then overnight they hatched....they were not moving about, no appendages were visible. If it had been outside I would have left them, probably wouldn't have seen them unless they were on a window, as someone else mentioned. Sad to say, I wiped out the whole group. But thank you for taking time to answer.

 

 COMMENT 338313 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 08:47 AM

Looks more like eggs than mature or even young bugs.

 

 COMMENT 338401 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 10:59 AM

If my samples found outside under a brick step a few days ago are the same as those in question, I may have the answer. lentz exterminators collected samples and sent them to be identified by The Agriculture Department. Ours turned out to be snails, which viewed close up looks like tiny miniature conical shells. They are not the garden variety nor are harmful to plants, but possibly are harmful to other snails. An enlarged photo has been submitted. I collected quite a few and will watch them develop. The photos shows them live as well as their excrement at the entrance of their shell.

 

 COMMENT 338511 agree helpful negative off topic

2012-11-02 02:43 PM

Wow, I like walking sticks, favorite of mine since I was a kid, lets not kill them, allow them to live and be at peace.

 

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